TWIN BROOKS ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES <B>NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES</B>

Newsletter #106

November 18, 1999

Greetings Accumulators!

It's pretty nippy in the Big Apple. Since we've had very mild winters these past two years, perhaps we're in for a bitter one this time around.

FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF TURNING LITTLE KIDS INTO FANATICS
It seems the Pokemon craze is crazier than we thought. When the new Pokemon movie opened, Warner Bros. came up with a neat promotional gimmick. For every ticket purchased, the bearer got a Pokemon card. Well, the response was so tremendous (they sold 52 million dollars worth of tickets in the first week), theatres soon ran out of cards, and Warner Brothers had to establish a ticket stub mail-in program, along with an 800 telephone number, to avoid disappointing millions of children.

Meanwhile at Burger King, whose franchisees were offering Pokemon toys with kid's meals, supplies were exhausted almost immediately. Burger King says they're working hard to replenish as soon as possible (they say they're even chartering cargo planes to bring in more toys), but they claim that at least part of the shortage is due to collectors who are hoarding the toys, thus preventing the children from getting any.

And on the school front, it seems that Pokemon has turned some kids into little criminals. Reports abound of rifled backpacks and cards missing from friends' homes.

This brings to mind some earlier crazes. At least when it was Cabbage Patch Kids or Tickle Me Elmo, it was only the parents who were behaving like idiots.

JUST IN THE NICK OF TIME DEPARTMENT
There's an entertainment website and the people there are as unnerved as I am by all this Pokemon mass hysteria. The site, TheThreshold.com has a new show, called "Pokemon Must Be Destroyed". Every day, they kill a Pokemon in a new creative way. Today's episode was called "Dig It". To view the violence, go to http://www.thethreshold.com.

Ahoy There!
The greatest American maritime disaster ever (no it wasn't your Cousin Seymour's attempt to change seats with your portly Aunt Sadie in a canoe on the lake at Camp Wappanoksack on Visiting day) took place when the SS Central America sank in 1857 off the South Carolina coast. All 425 people aboard perished. The ship was carrying some of the gold from the California gold rush and for 132 years, the gold bars and coins remained at the bottom of the sea. Finally, they were salvaged, and are now being auctioned on the Internet by Sotheby's. The auction will take place on December 8th and 9th at Amazon.com. The largest of the gold bars weighs - get this - 41 pounds!

Well, Accumulators, this is one week when I'm keeping my promise about a short newsletter. Lots to do. Hope you enjoy your weekend. See you next week. Happy Hunting!

Best,
Judith

1999 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.
Antiques and Collectibles Newsletter #106
U.S. Library of Congress
ISSN 1520-4464

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1999 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.