TWIN BROOKS ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES <B>NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES</B>

Newsletter #46

June 18, 1998

Greetings Accumulators!
Did you miss me? No newsletter last week because my ISP, along with a good chunk of the Northeastern U.S., went down on Thursday. Artie and I headed out to do the Farmington, CT show, but the heavy downpour and trouble with the van turned us back. All is back to normal now.

FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF THAT'S ABOUT $5,000 A STRAND AND THERE'S NOT ENOUGH THERE TO EVEN STUFF A PILLOW!
A lock of Abraham Lincoln's hair was auctioned off this week in Los Angeles, and it sold for $26,500. The hair was supposedly cut off Lincoln's head during the post mortem performed on the President after his assassination (I can't figure out why they did that - they KNEW he'd been shot in the head!). This brings to mind a story I read in Life Magazine several years ago. It was written by a man who witnessed the exhumation of Lincoln's body some years after his death. It seems the body was to be moved and the authorities opened the coffin after digging it up, to check that it was indeed Lincoln in the box. The author was a young boy at the time and his father, an official, sent for him to come and see the proceedings. He rode over on his bicycle to view the remains. The fascinating thing about the article was that Lincoln's body was described as completely intact sans eyebrows. And it was accompanied by photos taken on that day. I was absolutely transfixed by the page - I couldn't put the magazine down. The photos showed a perfectly whole Lincoln in the box, looking just as we all envision him.

"BONES" WON FOUR HANDS AT PINOCHLE DEPARTMENT
In their never-ending quest to come up with weirder and weirder themes for art exhibits, one New York City art gallery has mounted an exhibit of skeletal photographs. The Steven Kasher Gallery is showing a collection of vintage photographs from the collection of Stanley B. Burns, MD. All of the pictures are images of skeletons. In addition to the medical photos, criminology pictures and the inevitable horror-filed shots from the holocaust, there are a group of pictures under the heading "Friendship". These pictures, some of which are very early, depict medical students hugging skeletons and playing cards with them. Those uproariously funny med students - what cutups! The exhibit will be on view through July 4. Personally, I think it should stay there until Halloween. For information, call (212)966-3978.

GO TINA!!!
Tina Bruno, lovely wife of John Bruno, jaunty appraiser on "Personal FX, The Collectibles Show", has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Professional Show Managers Association. Congratulations, Tina!

WHAT'S COMING UP
My ear is always to the ground, enabling me to learn market trends (I hope you are appropriately grateful that I'm willing to endure dirty ears for your sake)and to pass them on to you. Here's what's heating up: figural pencil sharpeners, spice tins, battery-operated and good quality wind-up toys, motorcycle memorabilia. Beaded purses seem to have taken a jump lately, and - look out: Beanie Babies are about to take a big dive.

Well, Accumulators, I'm about to hit the ground running. This Sunday, Artie and I will be at the Liberty Super Collectibles Expo at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, NJ. Also on hand will be Rich Zelachowski, ace appraiser on "Personal FX, The Collectibles Show", and all-around good guy. If you're in the nabe, stop by and say "hi". And bring money. Happy Hunting!

Best,
Judith

1998 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.
Antiques and Collectibles Newsletter #46
U.S. Library of Congress
ISSN 1520-4464

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1999 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.