TWIN BROOKS ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES <B>NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES</B>

Newsletter #52

July 31, 1998

Greetings Accumulators!
Hello from drizzly New York City. Actually, a little rain is welcome - we've had none in a month or so. I hope the sun is shining where you are.

FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF THEY SHOULD SEE WHAT'S BEHIND THE WASHING MACHINE
A builder renovating an old house on Main Street in Osterville, Massachusetts uncovered a secret compartment under the stairs. The compartment contained a revolutionary war-era cannon. Unfortunately, a fire in the county courthouse during the nineteenth century destroyed the house records, so the eighteenth century owner of the house is unknown. Theories of why the cannon was hidden in the compartment abound. Some think it may have been hidden there in anticipation of attack by the British during the War of 1812. Some think it may have been confiscated from a ship. Two other interesting and valuable items were found in the house. Ralph and Martha Cahoon, two noted American folk artists, lived in the house during the 1930's. Wall panels painted by them were found hidden behind a cupboard.

AND THE CANDLES WILL COME IN HANDY IF THERE'S A POWER FAILURE DEPARTMENT
Looking for a great place to send the kids for a week? The Storrowton Village Museum in West Springfield, Mass is offering a unique five-day program for children, ages 7 to 12, at a cost of $125 per child. There are also opportunities for junior counselors, ages 14 and 15. Here's the program:
Day 1 - Old and New Day. Children wear nineteenth century clothing and learn about New England life in the 1800s.
Day 2 - Hands On Day - campers learn early American crafts, including candle dipping, tin smithing and pottery making. They also learn nineteenth century songs and dances (to live musical accompaniment) and do lessons on slates in a one-room schoolhouse.
Day 3 - Dairy Day - children visit a dairy, milk the cows and churn butter. They also make muffins from scratch - grinding the grain and harvesting herbs from the garden - which they bake on an open hearth.
Day 4 - Wool Day - the kids watch sheep being shorn, and then card, spin, weave and dye the wool.
Day 5 - Show-Off Day - campers get to take their parents on a tour of the village, showing them what they've learned, and performing skits on the village stage.

Kids also get to write with quill pens, hear traditional stories and play hoop and sack games.

The program runs from August 10 to 14, 1998. For more information, call (413)787-0136

REPROS, REPROS, AND FAKES
It seems to be the law of the land. Any time a collectible gains importance in the market, someone will find an inexpensive way to reproduce it, which is fine, except that someone else will find a way of removing its identification as a reproduction and sell it as a vintage item to unsuspecting buyers. It helps to know ahead of time what is being copied, so you can be on the lookout. So here's a roster of the latest faux antiques to hit the market:

RS Prussia porcelains - being reproduced in China and Japan. Recently seen: mocha sets, hat pin holders, miniature shoes, two-piece eggs and ewers.

Milk glass - Summit Glass of Ohio is making pieces marked "McKee", some from old molds, some from new ones meant to look old.

Little Red Riding Hood cookie jars - some have a Hull Pottery mark and some have a McCoy Pottery mark. The new Hull jars are smaller than the originals, only 12 inches tall. Originals measure 13.25 inches.

Coca Cola collectibles - 1939 New York World's Fair paper coasters, stamped metal tokens marked "L.A. Stamp" and a tri-fold trade card picturing a woman in a bathtub. The first two are fantasy items, so ignore them whenever you see them. The third is a reproduction, which can be distinguished under magnification by the dots in the printing, and also by rounded corners.

Well, Accumulators, the rain has stopped, and it's time to pack up and get ready for The Great Paper Chase, a paper show Artie and I are doing on Sunday at Fairleigh Dickenson University in Hackensack, NJ. If you're in the nabe, stop by. It's amazing what you'll see at this show. And bring money. Happy hunting!

Best,
Judith

1998 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.
Antiques and Collectibles Newsletter #52
U.S. Library of Congress
ISSN 1520-4464

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1999 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.