TWIN BROOKS ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES <B>NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES</B>

Newsletter #36

April 4, 1998

Greetings Accumulators!
We are in the midst of doing the Triple Pier Expo here in New York City. It's a tremendous show with enormous crowds of buyers and wonderful items you've never seen before! It's also a very civilized show to do, and I know the dealers out there will understand what I'm saying. Many celebs attend the show and I'm always amazed when they recognize me and say they're fans of "Personal FX". Let us move along, as the show opens for the day in a little over three hours.

FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF WHAT A SET OF PIPES
Ella Fitzgerald, who was indisputably one of the finest voices ever to grace the world's ears, has gone on to her final reward. But her son has generously decided to share his fabulous mementos of his mother with the rest of us. The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC has mounted an exhibit of his donated collection of Ella Fitzgerald memorabilia. Included are many photos (including that famous one by Annie Lebovitz of Ella and the car), costumes, music, letters and more. We can only hope that the collection will be sent out on tour so that we can all see it. For now though, you have to go to Washington to see this tribute to America's songbird.

YEAH, WELL HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE THE PERSON THAT HELD THE YARD SALE? DEPARTMENT
An auction of antiques was held in the Harborlight Mall in North Weymouth, Mass on January 29. The top grossing lot in the sale was an oak Gustav Stickley bride's chest that earned $8,250. Now, that's not the highest price ever paid for an item of this type, and especially not for a Gustav Stickley. So, what was so unusual about this chest? It had been purchased by the consignor at a yard sale for a few dollars, and had been used as a coffee table until someone wised up and looked at the mark on it. Of course, now the consignor has to serve her guests drinks on TV tray tables, but she probably hasn't got much time to entertain, what with the fifty or so yard sales she must be attending each weekend.

DIG IT!
The now defunct United States Pottery Company in Bennington, VT is the site of an archeological dig. The pottery, in business from 1847 to 1858 was the earliest pottery in New England, and also the largest. It was the first to produce Parianware and so far, the dig has uncovered examples of forms and materials heretofore undiscovered. The Bennington Museum, administrator of the project, is looking for volunteers and contributors. You can reach them by writing to The Bennington Museum Archeology Project, Att: Mary Gardner, The Bennington Museum, West Main Street, Bennington, VT 05201, or by calling Cathie Zusy at (617)868-0489 or Victor Rolando at (802)442-0105.

"PERSONAL FX, THE COLLECTIBLES SHOW"
For 1,000 episodes and nearly four years, this show has been on the top of the heap when it comes to collecting. Many people write to me asking what John Burke or Claire Carter are really like, what we do during commercials, and whether it's as much fun as it seems to be. To read about it, follow link

Well Accumulators, it's been nice typing to you. Off to the land of heavy duty commerce. Happy Hunting!

Best,
Judith

1998 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.
Antiques and Collectibles Newsletter #36
U.S. Library of Congress
ISSN 1520-4464

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1999 Judith Katz-Schwartz. All rights reserved.